Publications on Acne treatment

By: | Tags: | Comments: 0 | June 8th, 2016

Acupuncture in dermatology: an historical perspective..

Author information

  • 1Dermatology Department, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, UK. eunicetan@doctors.org.uk

Classical acupuncture focuses primarily on treating the person, and secondarily treating the illness. The “symptoms” are regarded as “branch” expressions of a “root” (constitutional) imbalance. Different root imbalances can produce the same symptoms. Five patients with eczema, for example, may reveal five distinct root imbalances and would all be treated very differently. Because acupuncture treats the whole person, it has something to offer almost every condition. In many cases, acupuncture aims to bring about a complete cure; in others, it aims to manage the problem. Acupuncture remains a substantial part of the traditional Chinese medicine, which is used to treat many conditions including acne, alopecia, dermatitis, pruritus, psoriasis, rosacea, systemic lupus erythematosus, urticaria, herpes zoster, chicken pox, impetigo, leprosy, vitiligo, and tinea. This review introduces the historical context of acupuncture within Chinese medicine and how it relates to skin disease. Specifically, a key question is, what can we learn from the ancients with regard to their use of acupuncture as part of a holistic system of medicine, and how does this relate to the practice of modern dermatology?

  • http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19538380
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Clinical observation on the effect of earlobe-bleeding plus body acupuncture in 85 cases of common acne.

Author information

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To observe the clinical effect of earlobe-bleeding plus body acupuncture for common acne.

METHODS:

The earlobe-bleeding plus local and body acupuncture based on syndrome differentiation was adopted for 85 cases of common acne.

RESULTS:

Of the 85 cases treated, 61 were cured, 12 markedly effective, 9 improved, and 3 failed. The total effective rate was 96.47%.

CONCLUSIONS:

The therapy can treat both the Biao-symptom and Ben-root of common acne, short in course and effective in result.

Observation on therapeutic effect of ear point blood-letting combined with cupping on Back-shu points for treatment of acne vulgaris].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

  • Dingxi City People’s Hospital, Gansu 743000, China. ssjdx@eyou.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare clinical therapeutic effects of combined ear point blood-letting therapy, oral administration of medicine and external application of medicine on acne vulgaris.

METHODS:

The patients of acne vulgaris were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group. The treatment group were treated with ear point blood-letting combined with cupping at Back-shu points; and the control group with oral administration of Tetracycline and external application of Cuochuangping Ointment.

RESULTS:

After treatment of 1approximately 3 courses, the cured rate (50.0%) and the total effective rate (92.9%) in the treatment group were significantly higher than 17.6% and 76.5% in the control group with a very significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01); a half year later, the recurrence rate or the deteriorative rate in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.01).

CONCLUSION:

The therapeutic effect of ear point blood-letting combined with cupping at Back-shu points is significantly better than that of oral administration of Tetracycline and external application of Cuochuangping Ointment.

PMID:
17853767
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17853767

Efficacy of ah shi point acupuncture on acne vulgaris.

Author information

  • 1Department of Oriental Dermatology, Kyung Hee University, East-West Neo Medical Center, 149 Sangil-dong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-090, Korea. inhwajun@khnmc.or.kr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Ah shi point acupuncture involves inserting needles at painful or pathological sites.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the efficacy of ah shi point and general acupuncture point treatment of acne vulgaris.

METHODS:

36 subjects were recruited and randomised in a double-blind (patient-blind and observer-blind) controlled trial to receive acupuncture either at general acupuncture points only, or at both general acupuncture points and ah shi points 12 times over 6 weeks. The subjects were evaluated using the following outcome measurements: an inflammatory lesion count, a quality-of-life scale (Skindex-29) and a subjective symptom score.

RESULTS:

After 12 treatment sessions, there was a significant reduction in the inflammatory acne lesion counts, the Skindex-29 scores and the subjective symptom scores from baseline in both groups, but no significant difference between groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Acupuncture treatment of moderate acne vulgaris was associated with reduction of inflammatory lesions and improvement of the quality of life.

PMID:
20813813
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20813813

Anti-inflammatory effects of active constituents extracted from Chinesemedicinal herbs against Propionibacterium acnes.

Author information

  • 1State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China.

Abstract

Interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from keratinocyte play important roles in initiating the inflammatory process of acne. They are used as major elements to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of drugs. In this study, various active constituents extracted from Chinesemedicinal herbs were tested for their anti-inflammatory effects against P. acnes using ELISA. Among the constituents, matrine, baicalin, ursolic acid, sodium danshensu, magnolol, honokiol, hesperidin and andrographolide significantly reduced IL-8 and TNF-α by human HaCaT keratinocyte cells pretreated with heat-killed P. acnes. Excepting hesperidin, these active constituents presented dose-dependent inhibitory effects. Our studies showed that all of them exhibited low cytotoxicity at 5 µg mL⁻¹ in tested cell lines, and even at 50 µg mL⁻¹, in the cases of matrine, baicalin, ursolic acid and sodium danshensu. Based on the obtained results, it can be suggested that these active constituents are potential acne-mitigating candidates for cosmetic applications.

PMID:
21999396
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Therapeutic agents and herbs in topical application for acne treatment.

Author information

  • 1School of Cosmetic Science, Mae Fah Luang University, Chiang Rai, Thailand.

Abstract

Acne vulgaris suppresses an individual’s self-confidence by causing distress with regard to physical appearance, which affects a significant number of individuals during puberty and is delineated by adolescence. Several treatments have been introduced to decrease the aesthetic and psychological problems caused by acne. The topical application of therapeutic agents has been found to be more feasible than hormonal treatment and laser therapy. The ingredients in topical acne treatments, particularly herbs and naturally derived compounds, have received considerable interest as they have fewer adverse effects than synthetic agents.

 

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